Painting Lady

Yes that’s me. The painting lady, in my ancient jeans and university sweatshirt (how old?and my gardening trainers. Now, I must make one thing clear – my lovely new parishioners have offered to help, and I have declined, largely because I’m going to be desperate for their help in the garden as soon as the weather calms down, and I really don’t think it’s fair to ask them to paint and garden. So it is that I have spent a fair amount of time wielding a roller.

The bloke from the bike shop, who also drops into the cake shop for coffee, has been measuring my fluency by the fact I have progressed from getting large smears of paint all over me to getting rather a lot of roller splatter. I am getting quicker, more confident, and surer about edging. The end is tantalisingly in sight – one more coat, then one more room, then I’m done….and just need to clean up ready to move in.

But today a different milestone has been achieved. The old dark green carpet has been removed, and the parquet floor revealed in my new study. I couldn’t be more excited about this, and if anyone wants to share tips for cleaning up and caring for parquet, please do!

(The image below isn’t my floor, but I’ve a feeling it will come up quite orangey once it’s clean!) 6a00d834220ecb53ef00e55020db078833-640wi

And why so happy? There’s something about rediscovering the essence that is immensely satisfying. Whether it’s building a relationship to the point of being able to share, or making a room the colour I want it to be, or finding something beautiful that has been hidden. When I moved into the Curate’s House, I didn’t have much chance to make it feel like a family home. I’ve had the wonderful opportunity at the Rectory. And the discovery of the parquet floor, well, that’s my gift to me.

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4 responses to “Painting Lady

  1. What condition is the parquet in? Has it had gripper rods nailed to it? We had two floors sanded and sealed when we moved to Alton. If it’s in good condition you could try soapy wood cleaner and then traffic wax. You really need an electric polisher (we had one in the church hall I used to borrow when the floor needed a polish) to buff it up, otherwise lots of elbow grease and a kneepad.

  2. No sign of gripper rods. One end has been filled in with plywood, but will be covered with freestanding bookshelves. It is a bit paint splattered, and looks as though it could do with a good scrub. I suspect it may be an ongoing project 🙂

  3. When we are confronted with this sort of thing at work, out comes the disc sander (which may be the electric polisher mentioned above) and sand the floor with over with 100k sandpaper if it is damaged then through 120k sandpaper to 240 or even 320 if you want a very smooth finish. Than I’d oil it with a natural oil for floors like tung oil. The wood will expand with the oil and feel rough to the touch, so you’ll need to sand it again after about 24 hours with 240 0r 320k paper and oil it again. You will get through loads of sanding disks, but the oil will saturate into the wood and make a smooth and solid finish, unlike varnish which sits on top of the wood. I’d avoid water because the wood will be very dry after all those years and will suck in a lot of water, which may cause it to warp.
    Check the wood type as well, by the way, some wood and oil combinations are truly awful, and use a vacum cleaner attachment on the sander; sawdust from some woods have been linked to cancer.

    • The slight flaw (Im soooo funny) here is that there’s a good few days of elapsed time here, and I don’t have that…..not with the outstanding painting…. 😦

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